The Repton Gazette and Brown Advisor

300 Frequently Asked Questions about Capability Brown, and a further 200 about Humphry Repton

Category: Planting (Page 2 of 8)

245: Did Brown work at Wentworth Castle?

The spoil heap at Wentworth Castle

The spoil heap at Wentworth Castle

Days come in late March or in April, when Spring has not wholly disentangled herself from Winter, but there is a freshness to the air and it is better to be out than to be in. So I am advised by the good folk of Health and Safety , who have asked me to warn you that happiness can cause damage in confined spaces.

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213: Are deer common?

The deer come to the door at Alfoxden for snacks

The deer come to the door at Alfoxden for snacks

Visiting from Suffolk, Mrs W protests that she is really not able to see the 18th century virtuoso and enterist, Capability Brown, as anything but a maker of deer parks.

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236: What do you know about valleys?

The golden valley, as fine an example of the valley adventitious as you will ever see

The golden valley, as fine an example of the valley adventitious as you are ever likely to see

Miss S writes to tell me that being newly arrived in Berkhamstead she took herself to view the town’s great landmark, known as the Golden Valley, and she wonders now if that master of beech-hung beauty, Capability Brown, whom she knew by reputation, could have worked his wizardry there.

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193: Now, tell me about Yew rows?

I find myself caught in a dilemma in respect of the plants used by the King’s gardener Capability Brown. On the one hand, Dr L writes from Essex to ask for more practical detail, as she is encouraging her students to consult the Brown Advisor. On the other hand Mr R of Finsbury Park, London, would prefer a deeper, more abstract, probe into the meaning of the formidable Capability Brown, if there be such.

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192: And which firs are spruce?

Mrs W from Nether Lamport has been in touch again and do you know, on this occasion she may have a point. She came upon me strolling on the High Street, her iron grey hair somewhat awry, summoned me to her side and asked if we call spruce trees ‘spruce’ for their spruce habit.

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191: Which firs are pines?

of the PINE tribe, set out as standards, or in groups, or in the outer ranks of a plantation, the lower boughs are their best ornament. How rich is their effect at BERKLEY, ENVILLE, FISHERWICK.’

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190: How did the laurel get its name?

When Captain Ken blew into the Tatler’s Waste-bin whistling that air from A.E. Housman – he has a light tenor and a way with a rousing chorus, in this case ‘‘We’ll to the woods no more/The laurels are all cut’

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189: Can larch ever work?

My friends at the Tatler’s Waste-Bin have come at last to the larch and very much to my surprise praise for its character has been universal.

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188: If no juniper, then no gin?

Conversation at the Tatler’s Waste-Bin, which had been of a general and easy nature, turned suddenly to juniper, and at a stroke Captain Ken and Mr Honey found themselves in opposition.

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170: Was Lapidge any good?

Captain Ken reminds me that he can find nothing to interest him in the careers of Capability Brown’s associates, such as Samuel Lapidge and William Ireland.

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The Brown Advisor©2015

By John Phibbs