The Repton Gazette and Brown Advisor

300 Frequently Asked Questions about Capability Brown, and a further 200 about Humphry Repton

Tag: Burghley (Page 1 of 2)

274: Could Simon Warner be right?

One is never entirely alone in the metropolis that is Harrogate. True it is Yorkshire, but this is not the Yorkshire we are familiar with, a place of crags and craggy visages, of whinstone and wind-swept moors, here the cream of society meets at Betty’s and barely a seat to be had, even on a Wednesday.

Read More

267: What’s the difference between a folly, a fabrique, and an eye-catcher?

Clatter! Bang! Wallop! You’ll forgive me. I have been resting. It began soon after I had a chute fitted to my front door – last Wednesday in fact.

Read More

265: Why do we need William Emes?

I recall a conversation with the late Dr Keith Goodway, whose knowledge of the landscape gardener William Emes was second to none, and sprang from Keith’s place of work (Keele University) his interest in the landscaping of the place, and the fact that William Emes had worked there – as he worked also at many other places in the West Midlands.

Read More

259: Did Brown plant groves?

Trimmed

The groves of Blenheim were captured in their infancy by S.H.Grimm

The good Yorkshireman Professor W*, to whom I referred in my last, has also raised with me the question of groves, and in particular, for he has a great interest in the subject, whether Brown himself was a planter of groves.

Read More

243: What is the ‘valley adventitious’?

A grove of sweet chestnut on the side of an adventitious valley at Benham

A grove of sweet chestnut on the side of an adventitious valley at Benham

There will occur, in landscape, natural valleys, small advances in the slope, hardly enough to be named.  At Burghley they carried springs and Capability Brown drained and smoothed them off when he made the lake, but in later works – Ugbrooke, Ashridge, Gatton, Benham above the lake – he offered to these adventitious declivities the same spare planting that he gave to the ‘valley direct’ at Claremont.

Read More

214: Did Brown really dislike deer?

In my last (note 213), I offered to my companions at the Tatler’s Waste-bin a list of all those landscapes of that fine man and lord-lieutenant of Huntingdon, Capability Brown, for which I had records of an active deer park.

Read More

172: Why were Brown’s limes common?

Throw out the gripes of Stephen Switzer, and that much respected Reverend, William Gilpin, as well as his confrère Thomas Hale, who regarded it as ‘not very picturesque’, because it presented too uniform a surface.  Let us sing the praises of the common lime.

Read More

162: Did Brown show a particular affinity for the Ionic?

The Gothic Temple at Burghley - hardly Gothic, not exactly classical, but with a fine entrance at the back

The Gothic Temple at Burghley – hardly Gothic, not exactly classical, but with a fine entrance at the back.

How fond and how French in their originality and particularity are the questions that Mme de B de V has sent me from France.

Read More

155: Has sufficient attention been paid to Brown’s architecture?

Mrs D of Hampshire has asked for advice on the attribution to Capability Brown of the bath house at Warnford.

Read More

141: Quack? Squawk? Growl?

Mrs F has contacted me from Kenilworth to ask whether Capability Brown designed menageries.

Read More

Page 1 of 2

The Brown Advisor©2015

By John Phibbs